Software Version Upgrade Plans

By Tamara Wilhite

Software version upgrade plans are the plan to roll out to the user community a new software version. This replaces the old software version on each user’s computer after it installed. Below are some common software version upgrade plans with pros and cons of each.

Plan 1: Chop and change all users at once

Pros:

  • Done at once
  • Immediately compliance once done

Cons:

  • Peak demand by users at the time period IT staff are also at their busiest
  • If upgrade fails, all users are affected

Plan 2: Do low demand users first, move up based on demand or usage level

Pros:

  • Easy installs for low demand users (secretaries, financial managers) creates positive feedback
  • Learning curve is started on users who are not left in a serious bind if problems are found

Cons:

  • Reluctant users can drag the schedule
  • Scattered users across many sites performing upgrades cause more complexity supporting problems as they arise

Plan 3: Upgrade with new computers or system refreshes

Pros:

  • Is based on the refresh schedule, providing a means of scheduling
  • Minimizes the number of changes most users experience

Cons:

  • If users get a system clean up after crash or virus and don’t get the new software version at this time, they go through two computer changes instead of one
  • Can take a long time to implement

Plan 4: Upgrade software versions by site or work group

Pros:

  • Planning upgrades by site allows support to be on site at the time of the upgrade
  • Everyone in a group changes at once, preventing confusion
  • Several small peaks of demand instead of one large demand
  • Software upgrades can be scheduled over time so that IS has adequate time to support it

Cons:

  • May not be fast enough
  • Different groups upgrading at different times can result in different file types or processes used simultaneously until everyone is upgraded

Plan 5: Replace incompatible application with a new, compatible application

Pros:

  • Compliance is achieved without rewriting the tool
  • New tool creates compliance once it is installed

Cons:

  • New software version must be in place in time to achieve compatibility
  • Users have to learn the new tool
Advertisements